Wednesday, October 27, 2021

Ventilation

 


Projects are all about compromise. Knowing it would take a bit of thinking to create typical greenhouse ventilation by raising roof panels while maintaining water tightness and that I would be pushing the season limits of getting this project done, I compromised. I bought new windows for four of the openings. Had I planned this out, I would have looked for some salvaged ones somewhere but I ended up just buying some bottom of the line big box store ones. They were super easy to install which saved me on the time element. 

The middle slot however on this side and the other, as well as the ones on either side of the door were not standard sizes. I could have ordered windows to fit but increased the price drastically. I could have spent longer planning things out and designing around salvaged windows or standard sized windows. Or I could just fill those in with a plexiglass window and call it good. I chose the latter route this time but in the end, it wasn't all that much of a savings, time or cost wise. More on that in the next post.

22 comments:

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    1. Fortunately, the weather has been cooperating and so had my body.

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  2. You're beating yourself up for not salvaging for window glass? Personally, I'm glad you splurged--the windows look great and I love that roof! Do you get bad winters your way? I was just wondering if this can or will be used year round...

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    1. I've seen lots of nice greenhouses built from salvaged windows but it always requires accumulating those windows which can take years to do. I didn't want to wait that long.

      I would imagine our winters are similar to yours but without the lake affect snow storms. We get snow but probably not as much as your area. It will be unheated so my wife may overwinter some plants that tolerate freezing conditions but in a wind sheltered environment but for the most part, it will be used the other three seasons of the year.

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  3. Such a professional looking job! I find everything about building challenging but didn't realize that windows would be so complex.

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    1. They are only complex if you don't have deep pockets. If you have enough money (and time), they will make windows to fit any opening you have. If it were a house, I might have done things differently but for a greenhouse, I got off the shelf with a little bit of custom to save on time.

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  4. It's clear I'm much farther south than you since worrying about winter weather is months away! (and based on La Niña and the long-term forecast, might not be a worry at all)

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    1. I always get El Nino and La Nina mixed up but I'm pretty sure for us, La Nina usually means colder weather during winter.

      The previous two years, we've had our first snowfall by this time. But we really don't get any accumulation until after the first of the year. The cold is the real variable. Last year, it got cold early and we didn't get the garden tilled in the fall before it froze solid. This year has been pretty decent though we are starting to get into our late fall/early winter period of overcast skies and frequent showers. We have yet to have a freeze yet but it can happen any day now.

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  5. It is looking like a cute little house! It also makes me weigh my options about moving into a smaller house just for myself.

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    1. My wife keeps saying the same thing. I think she is eying someplace for when I'm in the doghouse!

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  6. Two blogposts just read and I remain in awe of your practical skills. Looking far into the future I wonder how many years your construction will remain standing and in what circumstances it will disappear. Nothing lasts forever.

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    1. The concrete should be around for my lifetime. I'm hoping the rest will too.

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    2. I think it will be standing for a hundred years - unless a tornado comes through.

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  7. We have windows that open on two sides, plus a salvaged slider from a renovation. Gotta say, we are glad for those windows. It gets brutally warm in there on a sunny day. We were surprised at just how warm it got. I think you will not regret the money spent on those windows in the long run.

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    1. I'm sure I won't regret it. As a total of the budget, they were a very small fraction compared to say siding or roofing costs.

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  8. Looking good! I think you made good choices in your decision making process. Having a greenhouse will be a real blessing in the long run.

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    1. My wife is chomping at the bit to start moving things into it.

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  9. That looks good and such building always involve compromise. I may have a green house in my future, but I would like to partly bury it.

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    1. You should know. You've been in charge of building a couple challenging buildings!

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  10. Wonderful work, Ed. I am glad you were able to come up with a compromise. I have found that compromise has helped me be happily married for 17 years.

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  11. It's so interesting to see your progress, Ed. We can relate to the planning and rising costs and labor. Sigh... We don't want to do it again, but enjoy seeing the beautiful work you're doing.

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