Monday, October 18, 2021

Bountiful


 A week after our last visit to the garden, we returned to find all of the above. Probably well over 100 pounds of filipino upo, three baskets full of green beans, another basket mostly of tomatoes plus tomatillos, egg plant and okra and another basket of filipino sitaw (long string beans) and bitter gourds (those green warty looking things). 

It was way more than we cared to consume or preserve and so we sold all the upo to the asian store on our way back home. The three baskets of green beans, along with some bitter gourd, we gave away via social media and I turned the tomatoes and some frozen ones we had around into twelve pints of tomato soup ready to heat and eat this winter. I would have preserved some of the beans but we still have probably a two or three year supply already canned up. 

I did start some tilling though it is really too dry to really do more than chop up the green vegetation on top and the mulch a bit. My goal is just to till in the mulch a bit so that come next spring, it will dry out a bit quicker and allow me to work in the garden sooner, always a problem most springs. 

24 comments:

  1. You are a very industrious beaver.

    ReplyDelete
  2. That is a great haul. For one reason and another our little vegetable plot has been disappointing this year. Not as productive as usual. Must try harder.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Or plant different things which is what we did this year.

      Delete
  3. Man, that upo is a producer.

    Everything is pulled out here; I need to get the next round - a little late, but fortunately the weather here is a little more forgiving.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It is 47 here this morning. Our growing season is just about done.

      Delete
  4. Whew, that's some harvest! Ed I was just thinking of you on Saturday--was at the market buying a container of cocktail tomatoes, $4.99 for "2 vines". Growing up on a farm, it just made me shake my head. I remember every August, literally giving bushels of corn & tomatoes away... anyway, I knew you'd be the last person spending $5.00 on a little plastic container of produce, this proves it!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I've been there and spent similar amounts of money. I still would when needed. But growing a garden does relieve us of having to do that for the summer months anyway.

      Delete
  5. You sure had a nice final haul. I really like those baskets, too! I wish I had planted some turnip greens at the end of the summer, but oh well. Maybe next fall.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The baskets were a new addition late this summer. 5 gallon buckets were okay but we wanted something where we could wash produce in the basket and leave the dirt back at the farm.

      Delete
  6. I love green beans; if I lived closer, I would take some off your hands!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. We had three good Samaritans take them off our hands.

      Delete
  7. You have a super harvest here. Things don't always give you as much as you want. Sometimes a crop will run away.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I wish we had a bigger crop of pumpkins, we got zero, and less upo, we are probably closing in on 500 pounds or more of the stuff.

      Delete
  8. What a great harvest! We call those upos long squash. It is so good skinned and cubed and boiled in chicken/chicken broth with a dash of soy sauce and dashi.

    ReplyDelete
  9. That looks great! So nice to see your garden producing well after its slow start.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It is. At one point I had almost given up hope.

      Delete
  10. Wow! Your garden came through!

    I want to get the garden tilled, but since archery season has started, I don't know that that can happen this weekend. My sister always puts a black plastic sheet down on top of her tilled garden for a few weeks before she plants. The sun kills off a lot of spring growth, and cuts down on the weeding required during the season. I'd really like to give that a try this year.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I've thought about doing something similar too but with no trees blocking the prevailing winds, I figure the plastic would just end up at the neighbor place. It would have to be really well anchored.

      Delete
  11. We call those “warty” veggies bitter melons in Hawaii. I am so impressed with your harvest. I wish I was your neighbor.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. There are a lot of Filipinos in Hawaii so I'm not surprised.

      Delete
  12. Dang it! This comment didn't print either.
    Anyway, I was just amazed at your bountiful harvest. We call the upo hyotan here (at least my family does). The bitter gourds are called bitter melons. A lot of the local Chinese (and probably Filipino) people use them in their dishes. Mom hasn't done so, I don't even know how it tastes exactly.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I turned on comment moderation so they are getting through when I check into my blog and review them.

      Delete