Friday, May 24, 2013

Tornado Proof Homes


I've written on here more than once about Monolithic Dome homes and the subject always comes to mind when you hear about tragedies like in Moore, Oklahoma. Why don't more people in tornado prone areas build houses that can withstand a direct hit from a tornado with minimal damage? I'm guessing the concrete shell doesn't appeal to a lot of people but the dome pictured above is proof to me that they can be made to look appealing. Coincidentally, the dome pictured above survived a direct hit by a huge hurricane in Florida which did some cosmetic damage but suffered no damage in the living areas. In fact, people sheltered out the hurricane inside. Another dome survived a California wild fire with firefighters inside taking refuge and yes, one has even survived a direct hit by a tornado. It is my hope that someday soon, I shall make my home inside one of these dwellings that will still be around and just as safe decades after I am long gone from this world.

6 comments:

malor said...
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malor said...

I am dreaming of a home to be built in our property. This "tornado proof home" looks perfect. I wish I have the money...

roaring40 said...

What 'I've' never figured out is why the safe room in tornado areas have only one opening inside a building that WILL collapse down on top of it if ever it's truly needed. Surely if you are going to sink a room into the ground, it isn't beyond the realms to run a tunnel well beyond the debris field which would allow you to exit the thing.

I'm not certain about that design though. I would go for it, but I don't think it would take with the women. They have a picture in their heads about the style of nest.

Ed said...

Malor - Monolithic dome homes are on par with stick built homes as far as cost goes. The real savings however is in their efficiency because most need only about 1/4th of the energy as a stick built home of the same size.

Vince - For the most part, people here will come looking for you to see if you survived and will clear any safe room door. Only if you lived very remotely would you be in danger of being trapped in your own safe room. Since the entire monolithic home is essentially a safe "room", that wouldn't be a worry with them and yet another benefit.

sage said...

The witches of Oz will surely think that a flying saucer (instead of Dorothy's house) took out one of their members! :-)

Bone said...

A lot of people here are building above-ground "safe rooms" inside their houses since the 2011 tornadoes. I'm sure they are safer, but when I see footage of all sorts of structures leveled in an area, I'm just not sure that if you take a direct hit from an EF-4 or EF-5, anything above-ground is 100% safe.