Monday, July 5, 2010

Crazy For Columbine


My favorite flower and one of the few I can identify is the columbine. I first fell in love with this flower in the upper reached of the Wind River Mountains of Wyoming where they grow wild mostly in hues of blue. They are such delicate flowers and have four distinctive horns growing out the backside as you can see in the picture below. This variety is a springtime bloomer which gives you an idea of how long this has been on my draft board getting bumped for other blog posts.

Back after we bought our house, my wife was planning on what flowers she wanted in her flower beds that she was creating and I thought I would like a columbine or two. For some reason, it didn't make the cut for the flowerbed and ended up being planted at the base of the big silver maple tree out back. It did come up for a couple years but since it wasn't in a defined bed, it kept getting cropped off by the lawnmower and eventually stopped coming out in the spring. My wife however got a different variety that is suited for her in the mid-west and planted it in one of the flowerbeds out front so now every spring I am greeted by several clumps of columbine. I don't think I will ever tire of seeing them and it is certainly easier right out my front door than three fourths of the way up a mountain halfway across the United States.


9 comments:

Vince said...

I afraid the title of this one in my sidebar did not bring the flower to mind.

PhilippinesPhil said...

Still Ed, there's something magical about seeing flowers like this growing in the wild, ya know?

Murf said...

That color suits you too. ;-) I really like lupine and I always thought could only be grown in the U.P. but recently I've seen it around here AND blooming from within a pot. That might be on my list of flowers to plant next year.

R. Sherman said...

It's a great flower. We've got them on the glades where there are relatively permanent seeps and accumulations of soil.

Cheers.

Ed said...

Vince - Unfortunately, Columbine of recent infamy has overshadowed the name.

Phil - There sure is and something I never take for granted.

Murf - I thought it was royal purple?

R. Sherman - Anymore, it seems as if you can get them for any soil type or light condition. They must be a pretty hardy plant.

sage said...

Even though I love the flower, like Vince, I was thinking the school. I didn't realize they could grow here... Do deer eat them?

Beau said...

It is an amazing flower... I always remember finding them under quiet, secluded bluffs and near Ozark shut-ins and waterfalls.

Ed said...

Sage - I would guess deer would eat them, especially in winter if the going were tough. But since they don't grow wild, and I have yet to see them any other place here except at my urban house where they grow quite well, it has been safe from deer so far.

Beau - That is a new one on me. What is an Ozark shut-in? My guess is a valley that ends in a bluff?

TC said...

I must say, my thoughts went where Vince's did.

Pretty flower.