Monday, February 8, 2010

'Tis Almost the Season of Spring Fever

We are now entering the second week of February and spring fever is beginning to set in. Although we can get some of our lousiest weather in February, there is only two more weeks of it after this one and in March, nothing lasts very long. Besides, we've had the second most snow this winter as any in the records, we had a very large ice storm that knocked out a lot of the power and broke down many trees but with the inch of rain that we had during it that didn't freeze, it could have been a lot worse is the understatement of the year. But in March, everything will be better, it will start warming up and the daylight will start sticking around longer... or so we tell ourselves.

If you walk around outside during March, you can see right away while it is called spring fever. Though the temperature is slightly north of freezing for daytime highs, people are walking around in t-shirts and shorts or at the very least, a light jacket. If it had been the flip side of the year during fall, people would have already resigned themselves to their heavy winter jackets. So the people walking with so much skin exposed when the temperatures are so low, must be running a fever.

Soon I will be eyeing the garden knowing it is too early to plant, other than the garlic that I planted last fall, but still thinking of getting those tomatoes in the ground. Two years ago when I couldn't wait any longer, my tomatoes got frost bit hard and I ended up replanting them all in-between the frostbitten ones only to have them all come up. Last year I waited too long and the rains came. By the time I did get them into the ground in horribly muddy conditions, it was too late and I only got a couple tomatoes off of them before the fall frost got them. It is a fine line between secumbing to spring fever, a late frost, or torential rains.

Fortunately for me, spring fever doesn't last too long. It is only four short weeks because when April arrives, it quickly becomes overtaken by another fever that is ten times stronger. Mushroom fever. It builds up over the course of two or three weeks until those illusive fungi start popping and then it is two weeks of madness and mushroom induced eating comas before they disappear for another year. But first it is spring fever and it is only just starting. By March, it will be time to break out the t-shirt and shorts again.

11 comments:

R. Sherman said...

We warmed up to the high thirties last week and my wife was astounded to see me walking around outside in shorts, albeit for only five minutes or so. I'm ready for winter to be gone.

BTW, I waived toward the north on Friday from Kirksville.

Cheers.

geri said...

Tom always looks forward to the last day of January. January is the bleakest for him. I am always surprised at the bright colored dresses women wear on bare legs during Easter Sunday mass while for me I can't feel any difference change in the temperature, still feels like winter weather to me.

Ed said...

R. Sherman - I'm pretty sure I sensed the wave.

Geri - I'm usually pretty good with January after the December rush because I'm ready to hibernate with fires, movies, food and books. However by this time in February, I'm ready to just get outside and not have to worry if I'll freeze before I get back inside.

Vince said...

I've just germinated Dill seeds on a damp sheet of kitchen paper in the hot-press. And next I'm going for Fennel.

sage said...

it's interesting how much snow you've got and up here, we've had a mild winter with little snow... That's suppose to change tomorrow. We'll see.

Ed said...

Vince - For some reason, I've never been into raising spices. I'm not sure why. I guess I pretty much limit spicing my cooking to what is dried and found in bottles.

Sage - It's been a bizarre winter for sure. We got around another six inches yesterday with more on the way. This is the only time in my memory where I have only seen the grass once this winter for about two days. On a normal winter, we go weeks at a time, several times a winter where there is no snow cover.

Eutychus2 said...

Ed..
Love your optimism ... keep it coming!

Vince said...

Mostly I plant the herbs as they keep aphids at bay. Dill all around Carrots will keep off the root fly. And I just like Fennel.
Dill has a slight lemon hint to it that is delightful with Trout. And mixed into a Hollandaise it puts a dimension to potatoes that will ruin eating them elsewhere for you.

烤肉 said...

以簡單的行為愉悅他人的心靈,勝過千人低頭禱告........................................

Beau said...

Oh you're early! But yeah, me too. Dont' even mention morels... that's just too far off, at least mentally!

TC said...

Spring fever starts for me in November.

Morels...YUMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMY!