Wednesday, November 2, 2016

3020 Conversion: Part Two


It doesn't look like much with all the sheet metal pieces removed, but when it is together, it will be a nice tractor, especially at its sole job of powering augers on the farm. We got the correct batteries and I installed them with one being temporary since the battery cable that came with the kit was much too short. With held breath, I turned on the key and pressed the starter button. Nothing. I fiddled around for awhile checking wiring connections and checking my rewiring which did reveal one minor thing I forgot to rewire. But when I made that correction, there was still not a sound when I pressed the ignition button.

As I mulled things over during lunch time, I knew that more and likely, some of my wiring was the culprit. The kit had come with not a single page of instructions and so I had been working off instructions I found online that someone else had written and produced a Youtube video on, the only person to do so. The problem was that guy had different brands of components than we had in our kit in an effort to save money. I figured the problem laid with how I wired up the starter and solenoid and figured ours were configured differently than his were.

I looked online and found a schematic for the starter and did find that two of the posts were different than the posts in the Youtube video so I took the wire I had put on the back post and moved it to the front post. I pressed the ignition button and was so surprised when the engine turned over that I stopped pressing the button. When I tried a second time a minute later, nothing happened again. Unfortunately, the soybeans were now dry enough to harvest and I had to get to the field. It would be several days before I could get back to the project.

During that time, I suspected that when I had removed the wire from the back post, I had not put the nut back on to hold the remaining wire in place. When it initially turned over, the vibration probably caused it to fall off the post and thus why subsequent tries resulted in nothing. So when I had a chance several days later, I put the nut on the post and tried and finally, the tractor now repeatedly turns over whenever we press the ignition button.

The good news is that we know the engine isn't seized. The bad news is we still haven't got it to start. I've narrowed it down to a fuel issue (most likely) because we are getting fuel to the pump and nothing after it. After doing some more online research, there is a spring inside that often gets stuck with nonuse over time and probably needs to be loosened up. I started to take the cover off to check but got called away to finish up corn harvest. I have yet to return to the project. One of these days however, it will run again.

7 comments:

Kelly said...

It sounds like you're definitely on the road to getting all the pieces into place. I had to laugh at your comment about being so started when it turned over that you quit pushing the button. I think we get so conditioned to not getting our expectations up, we're sometimes shocked when things work.

It's probably good that you've had to step away from it several times. That's when those "aha" thoughts tend to surface.

Ed said...

Kelly - Yeah most definitely the heat of the moment sometimes clouds judgement.

Leigh said...

Are you able to get parts for it? That's been our biggest problems with Dan's Ford Powermaster 861. Seems we have to mail order everything which is not only a bit of a hassle, but more expensive too.

Ed said...

Leigh - Even though it is a 50 year old tractor, it is still common enough that they do make parts for it. They don't make original parts anymore but you can buy parts that will bolt onto it and work with minor modifications. In the case of the fuel pump, we are getting the old one rebuilt.

Vince said...

It's while, but I seem to remember that a few tractors in the area had to be hill or tow started for the electrics were banjaxed and the plugs were wired to the alternator somehow.

Ed said...

Vince - This could be but I would have to bypass several safety sensors that make sure that the transmission is in park and the clutch pressed before it would allow it to start. This tractor is diesel so at least I don't have to worry about plugs!

Vince said...

No, not spark pluge, heating plugs. I don't know how it worked exactly, but I do remember pumping the fuel along the lines until it got stiff to pump. Then opening the throttle handle full, putting it in the highest gear while holding it on the brakes. Then let it freewheel downhill until it got to a good clip, then letting the clutch bit all of a shot. It's own weight and the speed did the work in the chambers and you'd hear a belch and a roar as it took to life.