Wednesday, December 23, 2015

Drywalled... Well Sort of


I've made it known several times before that drywalling is my least favorite part of home remodeling projects. But as I hung the sheet rock up onto the walls, I thought that I should clarify it a bit. Mudding and sanding the drywall which is the next step in my project, is my least favorite job. The actual hanging of the drywall is a fairly straightforward and easy one person job (for walls) and I don't mind doing it. Pretty much all I need is a 4 feet straightedge, a tape measure, pencil and a utility knife. For cutting out around electrical boxes and such, a jab saw is effective and I have one but I also have an oscillating tool that makes quick work too. Since I am doing a false ceiling that will cover up about 7/8 of a inch of the top edge of the drywall, I started with the bottom layer. Once it is attached to the wall, it gives me a 1/2 inch lip to set the top sheet in place and help hold it until I get a screw in place. If you are drywalling the ceiling which should be done first, the joint between the ceiling and the wall becomes more critical and then the top sheet should be hung first which is harder to do with one person but is doable.

Now that I got it all up, I have to put on the corner beads on the inside corners around the room. This helps strengthen that joint and prevent future cracking. I will also be putting an outside corner bead on the overhead bulkhead to prevent damage from hitting it with objects in the future. After that, it is just taping and mudding all the seams and mudding over all the screws. Then comes the dreaded sanding.

Since my incoming internet connection is in this room and I need to maintain an office of sorts to get work done, dealing with the dust is a huge issue. I end up shutting everything down so that dust isn't pulled into the electronics and then covering everything with plastic while I'm working. After the dust has been cleaned up, I then have to undo everything to use the computer or to have a phone or internet connection. I'm just glad it isn't everyday that I have to do this.

Once the sanding has been complete, it is paint time followed by the finish carpentry which will include a custom built desk, murphy bed, closet and shelving. Enough to keep me busy for awhile. I also have to install the ceiling and trim work. But progress has been ahead of schedule at least in my mind and not that of my wife, so I'm happy even if she wishes it would be done sooner.

9 comments:

jambaloney said...

wow - that is impressive - you are gonna have a great office!!

i agree - mudding and sanding is the absolute worst - good luck!!

cheers!

Ed said...

Jambaloney - I think I would rather have a fingernail or two pulled with a pair of pliers!

Kelly said...

It's appears to me that this is moving along quickly.

Hopefully the next step won't be too bad. Just keep your mind's eye on that finished result!

Ed said...

Kelly - Well according to the master timeline of being finished before my brother-in-law and his family arrive in the middle of June, it is moving along at a good clip. However, I expect that the next parts will take me quite a bit of time.

Vince said...

A friend of the family who was a master plasterer gave me a few tips. He died since, but I still remember some. Apparently the trick is not to close things up too much. You allow a gap so when you're applying the plaster you squeeze some into the gap and forms a bulge behind that when dry forms a plug like a figure of 8. And of course the wetting of the plasterboard before applying the plaster was a blinking revelation.

sage said...

I'm with you as I don't mind hanging drywall, but mudding is a mess. Good work!

Ed said...

Vince - I've heard that with plaster but drywall is a bit different. With drywall, you apply a fabric tape over the seams and apply the mud over that to prevent cracking in the future. Also with drywall, you can have virtually no texture where as plaster there is a fairly rough texture.

Sage - Fortunately this is in an office with a door that can shut so the mess is largely contained to the room itself. I've done other repairs in rooms like the living room where it is open to virtually the entire house. Despite trying to contain the dust, I always feel like for months afterwards we are dusting up drywall dust.

Vince said...

I believe it's the same. We put on 3/4 coats, getting progressively finer on a block or brick wall. But when we divide with stud partitions we put up what we call plaster board or Drywall https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Drywall. The we float off with a gypsum layer about 1/2mm thick. You end up with a wall the texture of an eggshell near as dammit.

karl o'melay said...

I commend you on your ability to work on a space while being forced to still use it. It is very trying at times.