Friday, November 14, 2014

Hubbard Squash


The first day I spent hauling in corn for my parents was a cold day and the first hard freeze of the fall was scheduled to arrive that evening so during my few spare seconds between loads if my dad hadn't yet got the wagons I was to haul back to the field emptied yet, I picked all the squash from their garden. There was a lot of squash to pick this year and I ended up with a car load of hubbard and butternut squash that I hauled back to my house. Due to our schedule with an impending vacation coming up, I didn't want to start a new project so instead, I processed a dozen squash for canning.

Hubbard squash are very large, the one above was probably close to 40 pounds, and have a thick rind so they aren't the easiest thing to cut down into manageable pieces to bake. (Note the regulation sized fork stuck into it for scale.) The first year I used a hammer and a large chef's knife but destroyed the knife in the process. I've used other things but eventually I found the tool of choice. I use my vibrational mutli-tool that is a must have in the shop these days because it slices through the thick rind like butter. I just clean it up real well before using it on our edible produce. I cut the squash in half and scoop out the seeds and bitter stringy material in the middle as seen above and then cut them into quarters and bake until soft. I then scoop the flesh from the skin and pack into quart jars which I then can in a pressure canner. Then we use it throughout the year to make pumpkin pies, rolls, cakes, cookies, bread and one of my personal favorites, ice cream. It is so good.

5 comments:

sage said...

For a 40 pounder, do you get out the chain saw? I love squash.

Ed said...

Sage - I've thought about that but I'm not sure it would be wise to do so indoors! The multi-tool thing works well though my blade was just slightly too short to make it through the rind. However it cut deep enough that a good wrap on the butcher block split it the rest of the way open. I ended up canning about 30 quarts of squash and only quit because I ran out of jars. I still have four left that will probably just be used as decorations until they go soft and then tossed down in the ditch for the wildlife and fertilizer aspects.

roaring40 said...

My, but that thing is huge. Was it the summer that caused the size.

warren said...

I love these big old squash also...they store for a long time so we usually just leave them as-is until we want to use them. They do take up a lot of room though and don'r stack so well...

woodysrockyridge said...

Ha! I used my reciprocating saw with a demo blade on mine. It worked great.