Wednesday, July 23, 2014

Kamagong Journals Part Seven: Rice Paddies


Down in the low lands, rice is a big part of the economy in the Philippines. My brother-in-law has been managing the family farm inherited after my wife's father died when she was just a little girl. Recently he has been trying to get it deeded over in his name so that it is his legally too. In the photo above, you can see his land in the strip where I am standing. The strip is about 40 feet wide and extends through the submerged rice paddy all the way to a distant strip of taller grass near the trees in the background. The other strips of land to the left and right of my brother-in-law's strip belong to other farmers.

In the Philippines, land is more community based that here in the States. You still physically own the land and farm it but there aren't many fences and nobody really cares if someone walks across your paddy on the way to their paddy. You will see big fields of these paddies belonging to many farmers who live nearby.


In the off season, it is common to see carabao (water oxen seen above), cows, goat (seen below) or other animals grazing away in the paddies. When it gets close to planting time which coincided with my visit, they will prepare a paddy among all the paddies and sew rice seed thickly in it. When the rice sprouts and gets to be about 8 or 10 inches tall, it is pulled in clumps and divided among the patty owners who will then plant it in their paddy in more orderly rows spaced out a couple inches or so. Before they plant their paddies or even flood them with water, the earth is first tilled with small tractors and equipment. This kills all the weeds growing in the paddy and loosens the soil for the next step.



Once the earth has been tilled, the paddy is flooded with water pumped in from a nearby stream. The farmer will then get his kuliglig which is the device seen in the picture above. It is similar to a tiller but with reel like blades (similar to the old lawn mowers) on each side in place of the wheels. An engine powers those reel blades which stir up the water and the loosened dirt into a mud slurry. Once the slurry is thick enough, the farmers take the clumps of rice grown from see and they poke them roots first into the slurry as they are doing in the picture below. There they continue to grow as the slurry dries out and eventually are harvested.


 
Traditionally the farmers lived on their land in nipa huts similar to the one above. These structures were build on bamboo poles stuck in the earth and had suspended floors that kept the occupants dry above their paddies. I still seem some of these in use in the rural areas but most of the farmers now live off their paddies in nearby houses looking like the one seen below. The nipa huts that I still see around appear to be shade relief for the farmers out working in their fields. The one above that I took through the windshield of a moving car is actually in a harvested tobacco field which you see here and there throughout the Luzon province. Another fairly common crop you see if cassava and occasionally dragon fruit. I also saw a few paddies of corn too. I'm not sure if it was the field corn variety or what passes for sweet corn in the Philippines. Their sweet corn is more like our field corn, tough and no sweetness. It really blows their mind when they sink their teeth into some Iowa grown sweetcorn. I usually cook two or three times more corn than I would for native Iowans and they will go through it all in one sitting like crack junkies three days after their last high.


4 comments:

Ron said...

This whole series has been very interesting - photos and commentary. Thanks for sharing.

Ed said...

Ron - I'm glad you enjoy them. As you can probably tell, foreign cultures fascinate me in just about all aspects of life.

ErinFromIowa said...

Learning while I enjoy reading. So interesting!

Ed said...

Erin- I'm happy that you are enjoying them. I have quite a few more posts that I'm working on.