Monday, September 3, 2012

Graffiti of Madison County: Part Two


One last blog post on the remnants of my camera that I finally downloaded before I get back to my life in general. Shortly after we moved, we took a break from unpacking and spent a day showing my mother-in-law the sites of Madison county, Iowa, namely the famous covered bridges and the birthplace of John Wayne. The bridges are picturesque and nice to see but what really seems to amuse me whenever I visit is the graffiti on them. Now before you get up in arms, let me explain. Someone or organization paints the first ten feet or so of each entrance of the bridge white and seems to encourage that people leave their mark their versus on the unpainted wood throughout the rest of the bridge. This way someone can repaint from time to time and things will look back to normal. Lots of people leave their mark on the painted surfaces but unfortunately people still graffiti the rest. But back tot he topic at hand, I love to read what people have written down. Most whimsical, some humorous, some sad. A little of everything. I took lots of photos of the graffiti and posted some of the better ones here for your reading pleasure.










Not graffiti but I get a kick out of how the tree knots wore slower than the rest of the planks leaving a textured surface.




7 comments:

sage said...

what is this human need to write on things... whether caves or bridges or bathroom walls?

Ed said...

Sage - I guess it is our ever ending desire to be remembered. Personally, I think a chisel and a rock would last a bit longer than marker on wood.

Ed said...

Sage - That or the internet!

Vince said...

I forget the full reasoning why they covered the bridge but it goes back to the 16C and it's fixation on the devil and his evil not crossing.

Ed said...

Vince - According to those from Madison county, it was because a bridge with a rough lasted much longer than those without.

Vince said...

I suspect that is the serendipitous result but it's not the reason why they roofed the thing.
I suspect the people came from a small area of England, the Rhineland or Pennsylvania and took the http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lychgate idea and ran with it.

warren said...

I love so many of those...I like stuff like that but wish people would follow the "rules" of writing only on the white. Anyhow, great pics!