Wednesday, October 19, 2011

Chopsticks


Contrary to what the packaging on the chopsticks says, we were eating supper at the new sushi restaurant (not either of the two Chinese restaurants) that opened in our rural southeast Iowa town. While it is nice to get fresh sushi outside of the urban jungle without buying it at the local box store, I don't think this place will last too long. They are charging urban jungle prices which eliminates most of us poor folk here in rural Iowa from eating here with any kind of frequency. For what it costs to eat sushi there, they could eat three meals at any other restaurant in town. But the point of this blog isn't really about that, it is about the lost in translation misspellings on the chopstick packaging. You would think that the Chinese might run their translation by someone whose native tongue is English before finalizing the wording. I would bet most 2nd graders these days could catch the misspellings.



6 comments:

R. Sherman said...

Nuance in second languages is always a problem. Even my Ph.D. in Linguistics wife has slips now and again. And the chopsticks dude, probably relied on his nephew who had 4 years of Chinese university and took English classes.

Cheers.

warren said...

They are saving on translators though so they may pass on the savings...

roaringforties said...

Chances are the fellow asked a native speaker he believed was educated to give a once over.

Jeff said...

I'll "tuek" this under my cap and remember it... Sushi that far from the sea always makes me a little nervous.

Ed said...

Jeff - I used to feel the same way but nowadays, modern transportation methods ensure that the fish, especially the raw fish is very fresh. I have never gotten sick or obtained any parasites from eating any of it.

Murf said...

I remember where I was when I learned. It was sometime around 1996ish and I was eating at a Chinese restaurant in Tempe, AZ of all places.