Monday, June 28, 2010

Can You Guess Whose House I Stopped In At?


I found the bed above in Springfield and it wasn't as long as I might have imagined.


The same house also contained this desk which I thought would be quite nice for writing proclamations.


They were both in this house which if you didn't gather from the hints above belonged to a man by the name of Abraham Lincoln before he became President of the United States. The desk is the real McCoy but the bed is a reproduction. Still it was neat visiting the house of a president especially to see how things were "back-in-the-day." For the most part, the house would still be very functional in mainstream society if provided with plumbing and electricity though the kitchen lacked a lot to be desired. It was somewhere between cooking over a fire while camping and what we consider a must in today's kitchens though much closer towards the former end.

Probably the neatest thing about the entire experience is that not only the house is preserved but the entire neighborhood in a one block radius. It allowed you to walk around and scope out who the neighbors of the Lincolns were.


This was just an ordinary trunk in the maid's quarters but I loved it. I took a picture of it for someday when I am retired and working in my shop full time, I might build a version.


Due to the frequent comings and goings of visitors and the lack of concrete, sidewalks were made from timber and this one is in the Lincoln's backyard and is original. I felt awed to walk on the same planks as Abe.

10 comments:

sage said...

not only is the bed short, it's very narrow! I wanted to go to Springfield last year for Lincoln's 200th birthday, but never made it.

R. Sherman said...

Sage, got it, of course.

Springfield is a great day trip for us, only being a couple of hours north. This post provides the kick in the pants to go back up there.

Cheers.

Beau said...

Neat! Planning to go... I don't see how those can be original planks on the walk, unless used from some other structure? Nice pictures...

Ed said...

Sage - It certainly is a quick trip to see the area. Even if you include a stop for a horseshoe dinner.

R. Sherman - That is why we went. It wasn't too far out of the way on the way back home.

Beau - Now that I think of it, I agree with you. The only way they could be original is if they pulled them up a long time ago and just recently put them back down. They were in the process of putting in a wheelchair lift when we were there so it wouldn't surprise me if that was just one of the recent renovations. I wish I had thought to ask the tour guide how they could be original.

TC said...

I went to his birthplace in KY a few years back. Disappointing.

geri said...

I knew it was Lincoln's bed from the comment you made because I also thought the same when I visited the Chicago Historical Museum (?) and saw the bed where he died and couldn't imagine how he could fit in there. It would be neat to see that entire block of old houses.

malor said...

it is neat that they allowed you to take photos. we visited the house of mark twain in CT and they won't allow photos. anyway, my first guess wa mark twain's house. i am wrong...

Bone said...

When I saw the tiny bed, I thought you'd gone to Murf's. But then when you said Springfield...

Very cool that they preserved the wohle neighborhood.

Murf said...

I love Abraham Lincoln! I can't wait to see the movie that they keep saying they are making with Liam Neeson as Abe...or this house. Whichever comes first.

Bone, that is a GREAT idea. I now wish I had saved my old twin trundle bed I had as a kid. I would have spent all night laughing hearing Ed thrash around on it. :-)

PhilippinesPhil said...

Murf, anyone who loves Lincoln is alright in my book.

On old period "short beds," folks didn't sleep on 'em the way we do now. It was thought to be unhealthy to sprawl out while sleeping, so they mostly slept propped up in a sitting or half sitting position. This was especially true back in the 1700s up through the mid part of the 19th century. WHAT were they thinking!

No way is that sidewalk the original wood from Lincoln's day. I just don't buy it Ed. HOW in the world would you be able to preserve wood sitting ON and IN the ground like that? I don't care if it's cedar, after all this time it would be rotted away from the bottom up.